Hidden Pages
Friday
Jan272017

10th International “Clean Out Your Inbox Week” – January 23-29, 2017


The world's 3 Email Experts (Marsha Egan, Monica Seeley and Steuart Snooks) combine to provide you with ideas, tips and resources to help you get control of your inbox.

Visit the Clean Out Your Inbox Week Facebook page for more ideas from Marsha, Monica and myself - check out the latest news and ‘Like’ this page. 

Day 5 - HOW to pull it all together and empty the inbox (today!).

Check out today's resources below - an interview, blog post and webinar on HOW to pull together the ideas from this week and get your inbox empty TODAY! And join us for the Email Olympics - see bottom of this post for details.

Webinar

Don't miss today's Clean Out Your Inbox webinar

(1:30pm Melbourne, Australia time).

More details here

Register here

 

Interview #1

Listen in as Monica Seeley (Email Expert from the UK) interviews Nathan Zeldes, Chairman of the Information Overload Research Group and the world's Thought Leader on solutions to Email & Information Overload since the mid 90's.

Interview with Nathan Zeldes

 

Blog post

Today is your big day! This is the day we pull together all that we've discussed this week and get your in-box totally empty!  Read more on the blog page here

 

Plus, join us for the Email Olympics and win a prize!

The challenge is to achieve 0 in your inbox at the end of 5 workdays (like the 5 Olympic rings) in time the Sochi Winter Olympics which start on Thursday 6 February. Post your achievement each day on the InboxWeek Facebook page (include a screen shot of your empty inbox if you like). 

Sunday
Jan192014

7th International “Clean Out Your Inbox Week” – January 19-25, 2014

The world's 3 Email Experts (Marsha Egan, Monica Seeley and Steuart Snooks) combine to provide ideas, tips and resources to help you get control of your inbox.

This is the seventh in a series of 7 Reasons to Keep the Inbox Empty.

#7: There are more appropriate places to store email messages

One of the biggest reasons you tend to leave message in the in-box is because you’re not sure where else you can store them. You don’t want to forget them (or lose them) so they are left in the in-box, just to be safe but also creating lots of clutter and distraction.

However, once you get your e-mail folders organised it becomes much easier to move each e-mail out of the inbox.  

  • If you do need it again at some time in the future, it can be moved to an appropriate email folder (eg: Subject A, B, C or Client 1, 2, 3 or Project X, Y, Z).
  • If you have no folder for a specific e-mail, or you’re not sure which folder it should go to, or there’s not enough of this type of message to justify its own folder, you can move it to a ‘catch-all’ folder (eg: called ‘Reference’ or ‘Filing Cabinet’ or ‘Miscellaneous’).      

Woo hoo – an empty inbox!

Once you made one of the above decisions about where to relocate each e-mail, the in-box is empty again. Every e-mail is now stored in an appropriate location, rather than left to accumulate in the in-box.

Why not check out these ideas to get your e-mail folders organised so you can keep your inbox empty and get e-mail under control?

Visit the Clean Out Your Inbox Week Facebook page for more ideas from Marsha, Monica and myself - check out the latest news and ‘Like’ this page.

P.S. Get the full 7 Reasons to Keep the Inbox Empty article as a PDF document here

All the best!


Steuart Snooks

Friday
Jan172014

7th International “Clean Out Your Inbox Week” – January 19-25, 2014

The world's 3 Email Experts (Marsha Egan, Monica Seeley and Steuart Snooks) combine to provide ideas, tips and resources to help you get control of your inbox.

This is the sixth in a series of 7 Reasons to Keep the Inbox Empty.

#6: Avoids being interrupted by new messages

Let’s face it, so much of your work these days come in via the inbox. And when you have lots of messages sitting in the in-box, you tend to spend large amounts of time based in your inbox.

But being inbox-based makes it very easy to be interrupted by new, incoming e-mail. These interruptions distract you from the task at hand, dilute your focus, fracture your attention and cause you to start multi-tasking (which makes you even more unproductive).

This is made even worse if you also get an alert every time a new message arrives -  a ’ding’, the little yellow envelope and/or the ‘pop up’ in the bottom right hand corner of the screen.

So, here are three quick ideas to avoid being interrupted by new e-mail;

  1. Simply turn off all your e-mail alerts (click here to find out how)
  2. When processing e-mail, use the 4D methodology to handle each message only onceconvert those emails which involve a task into a calendar item 

Why not try these ideas today and see for yourself what a difference it makes!

Visit the Clean Out Your Inbox Week Facebook page for more ideas from Marsha, Monica and myself - check out the latest news and ‘Like’ this page.

 All the best!


Steuart Snooks

 

Wednesday
Jan152014

7th International “Clean Out Your Inbox Week” – January 19-25, 2014

The world's 3 Email Experts (Marsha Egan, Monica Seeley and Steuart Snooks) combine to provide ideas, tips and resources to help you get control of your inbox.

This is the fifth in a series of 7 Reasons to Keep the Inbox Empty.

#5: Avoids procrastination and indecision

A cluttered in-box results from (and also leads to) a lack of decision-making and causes procrastination. When faced with an overwhelming number of decisions to make (eg: an overloaded inbox), we tend to procrastinate and make no decision at all.

We need to learn to make a 4D decision the first (and only time) we look at an e-mail. Once you realise that there ever only ever one of four possible decisions needed for each new message, it becomes much easier to make a decision and then action the e-mail, moving it out of the in-box.

The psychological ‘drag’ of ‘unfinished business’ in the inbox

Otherwise, the weight of ‘unfinished’ business hanging over your head creates a mental drain and you carry this sub-conscious, psychological baggage around throughout the day. This is that vague sense of unease so many of us have about what still needs to be done that we’re not up to date with in the inbox. It also slows you down in other areas of work, cluttering your focus and attention, especially when you need to think deeply, deal with complex issues or be creative.

Your time is too valuable to waste on procrastination!

Visit the Clean Out Your Inbox Week Facebook page for more ideas from Marsha, Monica and myself - check out the latest news and ‘Like’ this page.

All the best!
 
 
Steuart Snooks

Monday
Jan132014

7th International “Clean Out Your Inbox Week” – January 19-25, 2014

The world's 3 Email Experts (Marsha Egan, Monica Seeley and Steuart Snooks) combine to provide ideas, tips and resources to help you get control of your inbox.

This is the fourth in a series of 7 Reasons to Keep the Inbox Empty.

#4: The inbox is NOT your to-do list

The inbox is NOT a to-do or task list – email delivers tasks.

The inbox is simply a holding place for newly arrived messages. It should be visited on a regular (but not constant) basis with the simple aim of making decisions – sifting, sorting and prioritising the latest batch of incoming messages.

Put a time limit on how long you can spend going through your inbox. Don’t get caught up reading articles or viewing videos etc at this time (schedule them for later). Best practice shows that for most people, 4 scheduled blocks of 30 minutes each day should be more than enough to turn all your email around within 24 hours.

You need to ‘kill off’ e-mail to get the in-box empty

Again, the aim of visiting the inbox is to process e-mail; to make decisions, not necessarily to respond to each email.

It might help to realise that the word ‘decide’ comes from the family of words that includes suicide, homicide, genocide etc and essentially means ‘to kill off’. So when you don’t make a decision about an e-mail, you don’t deal with it (or ‘kill it off’) and it stays in the inbox to be revisited and dealt with again at some time in the future.

The way to ‘kill off’ e-mail the first time you look at it, is to use the 4D method to make a decision. Any e-mail that delivers a task that will take more than approx. 2-5 mins should then be converted into a calendar appointment, rather than a to-do or task list – here’s how (and why).

By adding this new task to your calendar, you make a better quality decision about when to get this task done as you integrate into your schedule and balance with all the other tasks and workload you are already managing. This way, it can be dealt with at an appropriate, focused, single-tasking time in the future.
 
Visit the Clean Out Your Inbox Week Facebook page for more ideas from Marsha, Monica and myself - check out the latest news and ‘Like’ this page.

All the best!
 
 
Steuart Snooks